County sees heavy election turnout

(Jeff Moberg photo) Crook County Clerk Linda Fritz goes over final training information with Absentee ballot election judges  (clockwise, from lower right) Arley Maynard, Allison Roberts and Dorothy Greenwood on Tuesday morning.
(Jeff Moberg photo) Crook County Clerk Linda Fritz goes over final training information with Absentee ballot election judges (clockwise, from lower right) Arley Maynard, Allison Roberts and Dorothy Greenwood on Tuesday morning.

By Sarah Pridgeon

With 3864 total ballots cast in Crook County, the vote unsurprisingly favored Donald Trump as President of the United States on Tuesday. In local races, incumbents dominated the vote for county and city seats.

The presidential race saw Crook County cast 3347 votes for Trump and just 271 for Hillary Clinton. Gary Johnson, Libertarian, received 118; Darrell Castle, Constitutional, 18 votes; Jill Stein, Independent, 11 votes; and “Rocky” Roque de la Fuente, Independent, 6 votes.

At time of going to press, Crook County’s vote appeared to reflect the overall pattern of the nation. The results of the general election had not yet been announced.

The county also voted for Liz Cheney to fill the open seat in the U.S. House of Representatives with 2831 votes. Opponent Ryan Greene received 547 votes and gave his concession speech during the evening, while Lawrence Struempf received 115 votes and Daniel Clyde Cummings 224 votes.

The overall state tally had not yet been confirmed at time of going to press but Cheney was declared victorious.

Crook County supported Tyler Lindholm as its candidate for State Representative. The incumbent received 3344 votes against challenger Randy Leinen’s 385. The results were delayed in Weston County, but it appears that Lindholm will be heading back to Cheyenne to represent House District #1 for a second term.

Council Seats

Of the three municipalities voting for council seats, the most contested race was in Moorcroft, where all four seats were up for election. With eight candidates on the ballot, three of the four winners were incumbents.

The winners included incumbents Ben Glenn with 277 votes, Dick Claar with 225 votes and Owen Mathews with 209 votes. The fourth candidate who will be taking a seat on the Moorcroft Town Council is Paul Smoot with 190 votes.

The four unsuccessful candidates were incumbent John Aloisio with 129 votes, Robert Stewart with 156 votes, Alfred “Charlie” Britton with 123 votes and Larry Ferrell with 64 votes.

The two candidates for the Sundance City Council open seats were Jana McLean, who received 359 votes, and Joe Wilson, who received 481 votes. In Pine Haven, Karla Brandenburg (163 votes) and John Cook (189 votes) will fill the two open seats.

County Races

Most county candidates ran unopposed to win back their seats. Commissioner Kelly Dennis received 3200 votes, while the four candidates for the Crook County School District will also retain their trustee seats. Thayne Gray received 2954 votes; Josie Pearson 2357 votes; Keith Haiar 2092 votes and Dena Mills 2977 votes.

For the Crook County Natural Resources District, the three incumbents also ran unopposed. Wayne Garman received 2862 votes; Ted Parsons 2845; and Lily Altaffer 2773.

Connie Lindmier retained her seat on the Crook County Medical Service District’s Board of Trustees with 2798 votes. Incumbent Roger Jones lost his seat with 1299 votes to challenger Mark Erickson with 1503 votes.

The third seat, with no candidates on the ballot, will be decided by write-in vote, the results of which will be announced on Thursday.

For the Crook County Museum District, only two candidates put their names forward for the three seats: Linda Rogers with 2230 votes and Neal Gray with 2080. The third trustee will again be decided by write-in vote.

Constitutional Amendment

Voters in Crook County opted to approve Constitutional Amendment A by a narrow margin of 1837 yes votes to 1646 no votes, which would allow the Legislature to authorize, by a two-thirds vote in both houses, that the State Treasurer’s Office may invest in stocks and shares using non-permanent state funds. A three-quarters approval is needed to pass the amendment.