Buffalo jump open house this weekend

Join the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation Board for an open house event at the popular attraction on June 2 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visitors will be able to enjoy tours of the archaeological site with free admission and will be among the first to view the unique artifacts discovered at the jump.

(Courtesy photo) Some of the approximately 200 projectile points excavated from the Vore Buffalo Jump that will be on display.
(Courtesy photo) Some of the approximately 200 projectile points excavated from the Vore Buffalo Jump that will be on display.

More than 200 stone tools have been discovered to date through archaeological excavations at the buffalo jump. This collection will be on display, having recently been

(Courtesy photo) Volunteer Barry Floyd and several fourth graders at the atlatl station.
(Courtesy photo) Volunteer Barry Floyd and several fourth graders at the atlatl station.

returned to the site from the University of Wyoming.

“This will be just the second time these stone tools will have been viewed by anyone other than UW researchers since they were removed from the sinkhole,” says Jacqueline Wyatt, president of the foundation.

“The VBJF Board hopes that those who have driven by many times and haven’t yet stopped will take this opportunity to take a tour.”

Visitors will also have the chance to interact with archaeologists from the Black Hills National Forest as they work to preserve the bison bones.

“The Vore Buffalo Jump is one of the most iconic archaeological sites in the United States,” says Jena Rizzi, Bearlodge Ranger District Archaeological Technician and board member.

“We will be working to preserve the stories that this special place holds so research can take place in the future. These activities will also ensure that everyone can continue to enjoy and learn about an important piece of history within the Great Plains.”

Younger visitors can meanwhile follow in the footsteps of the thousand students welcomed each year through trip programs, partaking in activities such as digging for souvenir arrow points and using an atlatl throwing stick. A recent grant from the Powder River Energy Foundation supports this educational effort.

For more information about the open house, contact Wyatt at 281-0011.